July 14–August 5

The Rainmaker
by N. Richard Nash

Set in the time of a paralyzing drought in Depression-era America, the play tells the story of a pivotal hot summer day in the life of spinsterish Lizzie Curry, whose father and two brothers are worried as much about her marriage prospects as they are about their dying cattle. Enter Starbuck, the consummate con man, who promises to solve all their problems for $100. Guaranteed to break your heart and then fill it with hope.

The Rainmaker is a play written by N. Richard Nash in the early 1950s. The play opened on October 28, 1954, at the Cort Theatre in New York City, and ran for 125 performances. It was directed by Joseph Anthony and produced by Ethel Linder Reiner.

About the Play 

The Rainmaker, N. Richard Nash’s captivating classic, follows the Curry family as drought relentlessly parches their fields and kills off their livestock. A father and two brothers fret about the bleak future of the one daughter of the family, Lizzie who has no prospective husband in sight. Enter Starbuck, the consummate con man, who promises to solve all their problems for $100. N. Richard Nash’s The Rainmaker, runs from July 14 through August 5. Performances are Tuesday through Saturday at 7:30 pm and Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 pm at Gloucester Stage Company, 267 East Main Street, Gloucester, MA.

 

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“Nash’s 1954 play about Lizzie Curry, a woman just this side of spinsterdom whose romantic hopes are reignited when grifter/dreamer Starbuck shows up on the parched cattle ranch owned by her father and run by her two brothers, occupies its own cozy niche in mid-century American drama. Despite the backdrop of economic and environmental hardship, it’s not an Arthur Miller-like exercise in realism and social commentary. Nor is it as fraught with psychosexual tension as Tennessee Williams — no one would mistake sensible Lizzie for Blanche DuBois or any of Williams’ histrionic heroines. But in his own way, Nash is just as concerned as Williams and Miller about the effect of dreams — deferred and otherwise — as they begin to dry up with age, or at least go into hiding behind weathered wooden walls.” 

“Nash’s play is really about the tricky – and very American – balancing act between pragmatism and idealism.”

 

–Kerry Reid, Chicago Tribune 

* Member of Actors’ Equity Association (AEA).

Performances are Tuesday through Saturday at 7:30 pm and Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 pm at Gloucester Stage Company, 267 East Main Street, Gloucester, MA.  The final week of the run there will be an additional Tuesday evening performance at 7:30pm.

 

 

 

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